Feb 162015
 

I have been giving a lot of though on this subject lately.

 

A few nights ago, while looking at the clear dark sky and seeing those little lights out there, I started thinking that maybe we have it all wrong.

The Sun is the very same Sun (with some variations according to the “dark spots” and other anomalies) every day and, these days in Florida (USA), clear sky afternoons, no one cloud to block the Sun “light” and, yet, 58 degrees Fahrenheit. And these temperate varies. Some days, in some parts of Earth, the very same Sun will make temperatures at floor level, to reach above 120 degrees Fahrenheit.

What is the difference? The climate!

The Sun is right here in our “back yard” and it was, I believe, the source for the calculations of the speed of light.

“Light, from the Sun, takes, on average, eight minutes and 20 seconds to reach Earth.” The speed of light is 299,792,458 m/s. That said, the Sun sits 149,896,229,000 meters (93.7 million miles) from Earth (500 seconds times the speed of light).

When they say “light travels” are they saying that ARTIFICIAL light travels? Like when you point a flash light and turn it on, the light from the flash light shoots out and, if there is no barrier, it will look like a “light saber” from the perspective of the person holding the flash light.

Someone looking, from some distance, directly into the flash light, will see just a bright spot. From a much further distance, nothing will be seen.

So, does the light stop traveling? You could sit there at that further distance for the rest of your existence and you would never be able to spot the flash light. So, does light have a limit on how much it travels due to the mass and power at it’s origin? Yet, if you use some kind of visual apparatus, let’s say, a telescope, you would be able to spot that beam coming out of the flash light.

Update (2015FEB17):

Now, did the light travel into the telescope? Of course not! Yet, the light from the flash light is there even if you are not looking into it. This, apparently, is a dilemma in quantum mechanics: “the Moon is always out there but, if you are not looking into it does it mean it does not exist?”.

The same analogy goes for fire pits. With that in mind, I arrive at my original line of thought: the Stars!

As a child, in science class, I was told that the Stars in the night sky are lights from long dead Universe corps; that those Stars no longer exist but their light are still “on-course”. That’s why we still see them.

Even Neil deGrasse Tyson, in a recent episode of “Cosmos”, repeated the very same line. He did not bother to “disclaim” it as “…some…”. He emphatically repeated the very same line.

A few months ago, however, the scientific community invited us to observe or follow the death of a Star nearby; which went supernova and extinguished within a few days. Gone!

So, wait a second: a Star much further than the ones I stare at, in the night skies, died and disappeared within 30 days and, yet, the ones near “home” have not been able to disappear in the past 50 years? Something does not add up.

I volunteer that I have no academic formal education in physics and all of my theories are based solely in my crazy (or not) thinking.

Apparently the distance of Stars from Earth are calculated based on the time their light take to arrive here. Really? Who was able to time a specific photon (will get back to this beast at a later time) from a specific star?

I will continue this a bit later …

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